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Learning Improvement Program (LIP)

Promote Student Engagement in Learning (PSEL)
The student-centric learning enrichment programs are focused on the bottom-up approach; the student gains more independence and control by becoming aware of many ways to improve his/her learning. It is no longer the student just sitting in a class and expecting the teacher to do all the teaching for him/her; he/she is more engaged and empowered.

  1. Neighborhood Peer-Based Tutoring, Mentoring and Group Study Program
  2. Targeted Remediation Program
  3. Building a Stronger Foundation Program
  4. Student Leadership Program
Professional Support for Teachers (PST)

All the quality improvement programs focus on teacher training of some sort. Starting this year, Nepal government has embarked on an ambitious 5-year program called School Sector Reform Program (SSRP), which includes a Teacher Professional Development (TPD) program. The TPD is a 30-days training module divided into three 10-days segments, which are to be delivered one segment every year for each teacher. Each of the 10-days segment is further broken into 5-days needs-based training at the training centre, 3-days worth of take-home projects, and 2-days of auditing and counseling at the teacher’s school. However, government programs are not always implemented as planned. In order to work in synergy with this comprehensive teacher training program, we provide on the ground monitoring of the schools and make sure all are aware of the programs available to them and are participating in them. Beyond this, teachers need additional support.

  1. Teacher Student Assistant (TA) Program
  2. Teacher Coaching and Feedback Program
  3. Targeted Review and Remediation During Class-time Program
Effective Education Partnerships within the Community (EEPC)

"It takes a village to raise a child."
- African Proverb

The support of the community is essential for success. There are many committees already in existence, such as a Village Development Committee (VDC). All of the schools have their own School Management Committee (SMC) and Parent Teacher Association (PTA). Not all committees function well. The goal of this organizing is to better coordinate between the schools to standardize on common sets of best practices. In order to improve the main school (K-10), all the other feeder primary schools are included to achieve similar quality levels at all grades.

  1. Village Development Committee (VDC)
  2. Village School Management Committee (VSMC)
  3. School Management Committee (SMC
  4. Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
  5. Headmasters Committee (HC)
  6. Student Representative Committee (SRC)
Key Indicators

Our key indicators allow us to evaluate progress towards our strategic goals. It also allows us to measure success of our programs and provides insights about how engaging the students in their learning can contribute to improving the quality of education.

In alignment with Education For All aim, our target pass rate on the 10th grade national examination is 80 percent within 5-years of our involvement. While this is a measurable goal, it is intended as a byproduct of our underlying focus, which is in the engagement of the students in their learning. To be able to learn well is an essential life skill.

To achieve our goals, we introduce low-cost student-centric enrichment programs, strengthen existing school committees and work in synergy with government programs, such as the School Sector Reform Program (SSRP). It is inclusive of all the schools in the village. Our commitment lasts for 10-years, in which we have 3-years of active involvement followed by 2-years of transitional handover to the local community and 5-years of followup monitoring. We also assist neighboring villages in replicating the model for their schools.

Promote Student Engagement in Learning (PSEL)
The student-centric learning enrichment programs are focused on the bottom-up approach; the student gains more independence and control by becoming aware of many ways to improve his/her learning. It is no longer the student just sitting in a class and expecting the teacher to do all the teaching for him/her; he/she is more engaged and empowered.

  1. Neighborhood Peer-Based Tutoring, Mentoring and Group Study Program
  2. Targeted Remediation Program
  3. Building a Stronger Foundation Program
  4. Student Leadership Program
1. Neighborhood Peer-Based Tutoring, Mentoring and Group Study Program

The aim of this program is to provide additional learning support for students through their peers. The students are divided into groups by neighborhood and are divided into three groups by grade range: 1 to 5, 6 to 8, and 9 and 10. Using schools’ assistance, two students who are doing well in school and possess leadership qualities are selected at each grade range per neighborhood. These students are given a 5-days (two hours each) training on “How to Become a Better Learner” using our Student Handbook. The Student Handbook is a compilation of best practices of top students, such as their study habits, strategies and skills. Upon the completion of training, these students create study groups and select a central study centre in their neighborhood, which could be one of the parent’s house. The students regularly meet at these centers to study together; the minimum recommended is one hour twice a week. The student leaders share what they have learned from our training as well as teach and learn from their peer group. Teaching others is the most effective way to learn. Students also address each others’ knowledge gaps, do homework and review for exams together. To support the students, a Student Resource Centre (SRC) with dictionaries, atlases, boards/markers and other learning materials is setup at a convenient location. A student group checks out a set of learning-aid materials from the SRC on an as needed basis and after using them for their studying they return them to the centre. This allows the next group to check out and use these learning-aid materials.

2. Targeted Remediation Program

Learning is greatly impeded by gaps in a student’s knowledge. Traditional school’s grade level system is designed as a knowledge stack; each higher grade’s curriculum is further build upon the previous grades’ materials. Those students who miss out understanding certain foundational knowledge pieces in their lower grades suffer consequences later in higher grades when they have to make use of those knowledge pieces. To address this knowledge gaps issue, this program aims to work with the schools to identify the areas of need in English, Math and Science. Using schools’ annual test data, we pinpoint which students are weak in which areas. In each of the neighborhood’s group study session, remediation of weaker students is provided by the students who have done well in those areas. If none of the students in a particular group have done well in a specific subject area, remediation is provided by students from other neighborhoods. Also, when a teacher is absent students use the class time for remediation activities. Primary focus is at the 5th, 8th and 10th grades.

3. Building a Stronger Foundation Program

The focus of this program is on K-3. Since the government policy is not to fail students at the elementary level (1st to 5th grades), students who are not ready are promoted up grade levels. These students are fundamentally weak and it is very difficult to remediate them at higher grades. The aim of this program is to standardize practices among the schools at the primary levels, such as in the implementation of UNESCO’s Early Childhood Development (ECD) initiative. In order to improve English, the students need more exposure to the English language. The textbooks used in government schools are available both in Nepali and in English (apart from the Nepali subject). We work with schools to use their textbook funds to replace Nepali versions with English versions. It starts with grade one and every subsequent year replacement from Nepali to English occurs at the next higher grade level. We are also researching additional enrichment programs for the development of stronger foundation in English, Math and Science.

4. Student Leadership Program

Currently, students are not organized and do not have an effective voice on their education. Adults, comprising of headmasters, teachers and school management committees (SMC), make school policy and program decisions without inputs from the students. While there are student leaders designated by the principals, they are mostly used as enforcers to maintain crowd control of younger students. Rest of the students have no collective way to participate through their voice and action to improve their schools. The aim of this program is to create a democratic student council initially for the 9th and 10th grades. Over three years, student councils is formed in the lower grades as well. The student council represents students’ ideas, interests and concerns to the teachers and SMCs. They organize and help with fundraising for student activities, community projects and other school improvement programs.

  • The adviser acts as a mentor to the student council.
  • The president leads the student body meetings, organizes task committees, and represents the students at school-level meetings with parents, teachers and management committees.
  • The vice-president assists the president in carrying out decisions and acts as a substitute for the president when the president is not available.
  • The secretary keeps notes of meetings and activities.
  • The treasurer manages money and financial matters.
Professional Support for Teachers (PST)

All the quality improvement programs focus on teacher training of some sort. Starting this year, Nepal government has embarked on an ambitious 5-year program called School Sector Reform Program (SSRP), which includes a Teacher Professional Development (TPD) program. The TPD is a 30-days training module divided into three 10-days segments, which are to be delivered one segment every year for each teacher. Each of the 10-days segment is further broken into 5-days needs-based training at the training centre, 3-days worth of take-home projects, and 2-days of auditing and counseling at the teacher’s school. However, government programs are not always implemented as planned. In order to work in synergy with this comprehensive teacher training program, we provide on the ground monitoring of the schools and make sure all are aware of the programs available to them and are participating in them. Beyond this, teachers need additional support.

  1. Teacher Student Assistant (TA) Program
  2. Teacher Coaching and Feedback Program
  3. Targeted Review and Remediation During Class-time Program
1. Teacher Student Assistant (TA) Program

Teachers feel overwhelmed. Due to shortages of teachers, large class sizes and rural duties, teachers do not have time to plan for incorporating their training into the lessons. Often, they need to teach period after period, and what little remaining time they have goes into checking homework and other administrative tasks. Outside of school, the walking distances to/from school together with farming and household chores take up bulk of their time. The aim of this program is to provide extra assistants for the teachers so that they can focus more on teaching. The teacher assistants (TA) are selected from a list of top students and are compensated at an hourly rate. Each TA works at the most 10 hours per week and assists the teacher in checking homework and other administrative tasks, such as in monitoring a library or a computer lab. The TAs also assist the teacher in lesson planning. We provide a “How to Become an Effective Teacher” training to the TAs using our Teacher Handbook. As a result of these hands-on teaching activities, the student who participates in the TA program becomes more proficient in their own learning as well as gain a valuable life skill.

2. Teacher Coaching and Feedback Program

For those teachers who want help in learning about best practices, planning lessons and auditing their classes, we have a Teacher Handbook on “How to Become an Effective Teacher”. The Teacher Handbook is a compilation of effective teaching practices, which include chapters on attitudes and behavior, student management, lesson management, and professional development through evaluation and feedback. Our trainer works one-on-one with the teacher who has requested the help. It is need-based. Feedback of the teacher is provided by the students, peers, parents, and our trainer. Also, an annual student feedback on every teacher is conducted. The focus is primarily on developing young teachers.

3. Targeted Review and Remediation During Class-time Program

In an academic year, teachers are in constant pressure to cover all the subject material as specified in the curriculum. Each 45-minutes class is devoted to covering as much new material as possible. There is no time for dedicated class time for reviews or remediation after assessments. Similar to the Student-Based Targeted Remediation Program, the aim of this program is to address students’ knowledge gaps. Working with schools and teachers, at least one regular class a month is devoted to review and remediation. Students, in these review sessions, can ask clarifications related to any topic previously covered. Likewise based on the test results, teachers provide a remediation lesson in the areas that most students are found to be weak in. Primary focus is in English, Math and Science subjects.

Effective Education Partnerships within the Community (EEPC)

"It takes a village to raise a child."
- African Proverb

The support of the community is essential for success. There are many committees already in existence, such as a Village Development Committee (VDC). All of the schools have their own School Management Committee (SMC) and Parent Teacher Association (PTA). Not all committees function well. The goal of this organizing is to better coordinate between the schools to standardize on common sets of best practices. In order to improve the main school (K-10), all the other feeder primary schools are included to achieve similar quality levels at all grades.

  1. Village Development Committee (VDC)
  2. Village School Management Committee (VSMC)
  3. School Management Committee (SMC
  4. Parent Teacher Association (PTA)
  5. Headmasters Committee (HC)
  6. Student Representative Committee (SRC)

1. Village Development Committee (VDC)

VDC already exists in each village and is in charge of managing development funds.

2. Village School Management Committee (VSMC)

VSMC is a representative body from the individual school’s SMCs. VSMC will be the overall head for leading and coordinating education programs across the village.

3. School Management Committee (SMC)

SMC already exists for each school and has the authority over teacher contracts.

4. Parent Teacher Association (PTA)

PTA also already exists for each school but is not functioning well in a lot of cases.

5. Headmasters Committee (HC)

HC is made up of all the principals of the village schools and play an important role in program coordination across all schools.

6. Student Representative Committee (SRC)

SRC gives voice to the students. Currently, students do not have a channel to provide their feedback or request their needs.

Key Indicators

Our key indicators allow us to evaluate progress towards our strategic goals. It also allows us to measure success of our programs and provides insights about how engaging the students in their learning can contribute to improving the quality of education.

In alignment with Education For All aim, our target pass rate on the 10th grade national examination is 80 percent within 5-years of our involvement. While this is a measurable goal, it is intended as a byproduct of our underlying focus, which is in the engagement of the students in their learning. To be able to learn well is an essential life skill.

To achieve our goals, we introduce low-cost student-centric enrichment programs, strengthen existing school committees and work in synergy with government programs, such as the School Sector Reform Program (SSRP). It is inclusive of all the schools in the village. Our commitment lasts for 10-years, in which we have 3-years of active involvement followed by 2-years of transitional handover to the local community and 5-years of followup monitoring. We also assist neighboring villages in replicating the model for their schools.

IMG_3959
A. Promote Student Engagement in Learning (PSEL)
  1. 100 Hours of Peer Group Learning Time during a Year
  2. Peer Support Structure for Students in Every Neighborhood
  3. Tutor/Mentor Training for 10% of the Student Body
  4. One Student Resource Centre per Village
  5. Foundation Building and Remediation Available for Every Student
B. Professional Support for Teachers (PST)
  1. Student Feedback Once a Year for Every Teacher
  2. Student Teacher Assistant for Every Teacher
  3. On-Site Teacher Mentor/Coach available for 18-months in a 3-Year Period
C. Effective Education Partnerships within the Community (EEPC)
  1. Functioning School Management Committee (SMC) in Every School
  2. Functioning Parent Teacher Association (PTA) in Every School
  3. Functioning Village School Principal Committee (VSPC) in Every Village
  4. Functioning Student Government (SG) in Every High School
  5. Functioning Village School Management Committee (VSMC) in Every Village